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New edition of cover crop field guide released

Cover crops are used to slow erosion, improve soil health and capture nutrients. However, from planting to termination, growers face many production decisions.

The Midwest Cover Crops Council (MCCC), composed of representatives from 12 Midwest states and the province of Ontario, agricultural stakeholders and universities, including Purdue, is releasing a new edition of the Cover Crops Field Guide. The popular pocket-size in-field reference helps growers effectively select, grow and use cover crops. Topics include cover crop selection, cropping system recommendations and effects of cover crops.

Updates to the guide include recommendations for cover crop termination in unfavorably wet springs and planting green into cover crops. The cover crop species section of the guide has also been expanded to incorporate white clover, forage brassicas, balansa clover and several cover crops commonly used in a mix.

The third-edition field guide will be available for purchase in early December. The guide will cost $6, with a 10% quantity discount available on boxes of 25. Purchases can be made through Purdue’s Education Store here.

The MCCC will hold a live, one-hour webinar at 12:30 p.m. ET (11:30 a.m. CT) Dec. 8 to outline the updates and answer questions. To register for the webinar or view a recorded version later, go online. Attendees who pre-register will be eligible to receive a free copy of the new field guide after the webinar; limited quantities are available.

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