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Resources for Children and Teens

For Children
» Activities
» Books
» Links

For Teens
» Activities
» Books
» Links





Activities for Children
Activities for Children

Come Join the Circle: LessonSongs for Peacemaking
http://www.lessonsongs.com/
A fun and musical way for children to learn life long skills for building better relationships!

Make your own paper crane!
http://www.operationmigration.org/Origami.pdf
Paper cranes are usually used as a symbol of peace. Check this pdf site for instructions on how to make a paper crane.


145 Ways to Say Peace
http://www.peaceloveandme.com/peacelanguage.html
Saying "Peace" in 144 different languages.

The "Say Hello to the World" Project
http://www.ipl.org/div/kidspace/hello/
This site teaches children to say "hello" in over 30 different languages. It also has links to resources about the languages and the cultures.

Here are some activities that you may download and use with permission from the book:
Fry-Miller, K., & Myers-Walls, J. (1988). Young Peacemakers Project Book. Elgin, IL: Brethren Press.

Here are some activities that you may download and use with permission from the book:
Fry-Miller, K., Myers-Walls, J., & Domer-Shank, J. (1989). Peace Works. Young Peacemakers Project Book II. Elgin, IL: Brethren Press.



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Books for Children Books for Children

Make Someone Smile: And 40 More Ways to Be a Peaceful Person by Judy Lalli and photographs by Douglas L. Mason-Fry (for ages 4-8). This book shows simple statements accompanied by black-and-white photographs of many ways to become a peaceful person. It shows cooperating, negotiating, compromising, and forgiving as ways to model peacemaking skills. http://www.freespirit.com/catalog/item_detail.cfm?ITEM_ID=216

Paths to Peace: People Who Changed the World: People Who Changed the World by Jane Breskin Zalben (for ages 9-12). This book profiles 16 people who have worked to promote and practice peace in their lives. This includes peacemakers like Martin Luther King Jr., Eleanor Roosevelt, Cesar Chavez, Wangari Maathai, who works for the conservation in Kenya, Gandhi, and to Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, a political prisoner in Myanmar to name a few. The biographies are framed by collage borders with the opposite page as a colored picture of images, cut pictures, watercolors, and found objects to illustrate the personality of each peacemaker.
http://www.amazon.com/Paths-Peace-People-Changed-World/dp/0525477349

Peace Begins With You by Katherine Scholes (for ages 5-9). In this book, Katherine Scholes' text and Robert Ingpen's illustrations explain the concept of peace and how it has a place in the lives of people, especially children. It explores the many ways of how conflicts can be resolved. It then proceeds to include some environmental issues and other national and international issues. The book suggests the value of fairness as an effective way to protect and promote peace in one's life.
https://secure2.convio.net/sierra/site/Ecommerce/1211260915?VIEW_PRODUCT=true&product_id=2501&store_id=1621

The Peace Book by Todd Parr (for ages 4-8). Todd Parr explains the concept of peace in this book with bright and bold images of smiling people and animals. For each page, there is a definition of the concept of peace like "Offering a hug to a friend" with the "Peace is being who you are" message at its end. http://www.toddparr.com/books/

What Does Peace Feel Like? by Vladimir Radunsky (for ages 4-8). The author has collected and exhibited a wide variety of expressions for the word "peace" in this book. With bright and colorful illustrations, he shows scenarios that go with the descriptions of children from an International School in Rome, of how peace looks, smells, tastes, and feels. At the end of the book, Radunsky lists translations of the word peace in almost 200 languages. http://www.simonsays.com/content/book.cfm?sid=183&pid=501154&agid=10

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Links Links

AskAsia: Adult-Free Zone
http://www.askasia.org/adult_free_zone/afz_frame.htm
A resource for children that includes activities, opportunities for connecting with other kids across the country and Asia, and a showcase of children's art exhibits.

Global Kids
http://www.globalkids.info/
Features fairy tales, geography tidbits, and games.

Peace Corps Kids World: Explore the World
http://www.peacecorps.gov/kids/
This site explores the countries where Peace Corps volunteers are currently serving. It introduces everything from what people eat to what they do for fun.

Sadako Sasaki and the Thousand Paper Cranes
http://www.sadako.org
This site explores the story of Sadako and the thousand paper cranes and teaches children about the power to create change and values cherished by all cultures. It also teaches children how to fold paper cranes.



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Activities for Teens Activities for Teens

Come Join the Circle: LessonSongs for Peacemaking
http://www.lessonsongs.com/
A fun and musical way for children to learn life long skills for building better relationships!

The "Say Hello to the World" Project
http://www.ipl.org/div/kidspace/hello/
This site teaches children to say "hello" in over 30 different languages. It also has links to resources about the languages and the cultures.

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Books for Teens
Books for Teens

The Cow of No Color: Riddle Stories and Justice Tales from Around the World by Nina Jaffe, Steve Zeitlin, Whitney Sherman (Illustrator) (for ages 9 and up). This book is a collection of 23 brief stories and folktales with the theme, justice. After laying out the cultural context of each story, it is then told up until when the character makes a decision or takes action. In italics, the reader is then asked to reflect on what he/she will do/say.
http://us.macmillan.com/thecowofnocolor

Paths to Peace: People Who Changed the World: People Who Changed the World by Jane Breskin Zalben (for ages 9-12). This book profiles 16 people who have worked to promote and practice peace in their lives. This includes peacemakers like Martin Luther King Jr., Eleanor Roosevelt, Cesar Chavez, Wangari Maathai, who works for the conservation in Kenya, Gandhi, and to Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, a political prisoner in Myanmar to name a few. The biographies are framed by collage borders with the opposite page as a colored picture of images, cut pictures, watercolors, and found objects to illustrate the personality of each peacemaker.
http://www.amazon.com/Paths-Peace-People-Changed-World/dp/0525477349

The Peace Book by Todd Parr (for ages 4-8). Todd Parr explains the concept of peace in this book with bright and bold images of smiling people and animals. For each page, there is a definition of the concept of peace like "Offering a hug to a friend" with the "Peace is being who you are" message at its end. http://www.toddparr.com/books/

Spinning Tales, Weaving Hope: Stories, Storytelling, and Activities for Peace, Justice and the Environment by Ed Brody, Jay Goldspinner, Katie Green, Rona Leventhal, & John Porcino (Eds.) (for all ages). A sourcebook of 29 stories from around the world. The tales encourage the values of compassion, sensitivity, cooperation, understanding of diversity and skills such as problem-solving and conflict resolution. Each tale is followed by suggested activities, games, and reading lists that could deepen the story telling and listening experience.  http://www.newsociety.com/bookid/3764

What Does Peace Feel Like? by Vladimir Radunsky (for ages 4-8). The author has collected and exhibited a wide variety of expressions for the word "peace" in this book. With bright and colorful illustrations, he shows scenarios that go with the descriptions of children from an International School in Rome, of how peace looks, smells, tastes, and feels. At the end of the book, Radunsky lists translations of the word peace in almost 200 languages.
http://www.simonsays.com/content/book.cfm?sid=183&pid=501154&agid=10

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Links Links

AskAsia: a K-12 Resource of the Asia Society
http://www.askasia.org/

A rich site where teachers, children,parents, and organizations can read and learn about countries and cultures in Asia.

Odyssey online
http://carlos.emory.edu/ODYSSEY
/MidElem_Home.html
This site explores Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and sub-Saharan African cultures. There are puzzles, games, and worksheets.

Peace Corps Kids World: Explore the World

http://www.peacecorps.gov/kids/
This site explores the countries where Peace Corps volunteers are currently serving. It introduces everything from what people eat to what they do for fun.

Sadako Sasaki and the Thousand Paper Cranes
http://www.sadako.org
This site explores the story of Sadako and the thousand paper cranes and teaches children about the power to create change and values cherished by all cultures. It also teaches children how to fold paper cranes.

Tolerance.Org
http://www.tolerance.org/

This is an online resource for parents, children, teens, educators/teachers, and organizations that is rich with
     - daily news about groups and individuals working for tolerance and fighting
       hate;
     - guidebooks for adult and youth activists;
     - practical resources for parents and teachers; and
     - entertaining and educational games for young children.

Voices of Youth
http://www.unicef.org/voy/

This is a global web site for young people to explore, discuss and take action on issues that affect them.

World Peace for Children
http://www.ppu.org.uk/learn/early/early_index.html
This site discusses global matters that concern children and gives them tools to build positive connections with children in other cultures. There are also stories about peace-making.

YouthNOISE: Your World, Your Noise
http://mobilize.org/
YouthNOISE is a site for teens to communicate with others and to find productive outlets for their feelings. They can read news, articles, excerpts about pease,
e-mail the President, donate money to legitimate organizations or join an online
memorial.

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Tell Us What You Think     Materials retrieved and compiled by Larissa V. Frias, Mary Schultheis, and Judith Myers-Walls.

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For more information, contact Judith Myers-Walls, PhD, CFLE at jmyerswa@purdue.edu

Please feel free to link to, print off, redistribute, or reprint  any of these materials
as long as the original credits remain intact.


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