It's Time to Inspire picture

Do you have a passion for a certain subject matter, hobby, or interest and you’d love to pass it on to youth as a volunteer??? How about leading a *SPARK* club?

Are you a 3rd-12th grader with a special interest that you'd like to explore with others? Grab some friends and an adult to volunteer to head it up and start your own SPARK Club!

So What is a SPARK Club?

  • Designed to capture the attention of youth with interests that are more “out of the box” (such as web design, music, drama, martial arts, sports, etc. ... anything!)
  • Members focus on the same project or area of interest – likely very different from state-recognized 4-H projects;
  • Members pay the state 4-H program fee (only one time no matter how many clubs);
  • Open to all youth in grades 3-12 ... do not need to be familiar with traditional 4-H to join;
  • SPARK Clubs end their program with a culminating event or activity;
  • Minimum of 6 hours of instructional time;
  • SPARK Club volunteers bring their subject matter mastery to the club 

 

Nature Spark Club Now Forming!

Would you like to learn more about different habitats, how to manage them and basics about nature in Indiana?  Attend a spark club at Coffee Creek Watershed Preserve with the Stewardship Manager, Erica Wayne.  Please contact her at erica@coffeecreekwc.org for and let her know you're interested!

 

More on 4-H Special Interest Programs...

From our Indiana 4-H webpage at https://extension.purdue.edu/4h/Pages/involvement.aspx.

Special interest programs are made up of youth who join with an adult volunteer to study one particular subject or participate in one specific activity. These topics usually relate closely to the prepared 4-H curriculum. Special interest groups can form around agriculture (animals, plants, or outdoors), science, technology (robotics, aerospace, photography, or mechanical science), food and fiber (nutrition, fitness, or consumerism), or leisure (biking, acting, or singing). There is no limit to the types of special interest groups that can be formed.

The unique aspect of the special interest method is the way in which youth and adults focus on a common interest and together learn and teach each other. Special interest groups do not usually form a club and elect officers. The group does not continue from year to year. The group may have less structure than a project club and be more like a school enrichment group, but be unrelated to the formal school setting. 

Often, involvement in a special interest group may trigger a longer-term 4-H commitment. Both adults and youth are often attracted to a group that is meeting to pursue a special area of interest for a short time. Examples of Special Interest Programs include SPARK Club, Teens as Teachers, 4-H Fluid Power, Robotics Challenge, Experience 4-H @ Purdue, etc.