Adams County

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Forestry

September 23, 2020

The Forestry Project will help you to learn how to identify trees, uses of trees, the benefits of trees, and the importance of our woodlands. A knowledge of trees and woodland management leads to a greater enjoyment of the outdoors. An understanding of tree characteristics will allow future landowners to choose the best varieties for urban or rural benefits that include cooling, wildlife habitat, and reducing erosion and other types of pollution.

For Judging and Check-in information, check the current 4-H Catalog.

For Resources such as Manuals, Record Sheets, and Score Cards see the Indiana 4-H Youth Development Project Page.

Project Requirements:

  1. Complete 3 activities listed in the project manual each year. Completed record sheet along with project manual must be turned in by the established and posted date.
  2. Premiums and Grand Champions will be determined by the method stated in the Adams County 4-H Governing Rules under the General Project Rules section.

Exhibit Requirements:

  1. Create an exhibit that shows the public what you learned in the forestry project this year. Follow the poster requirements in this catalog. Choose one of the topics listed below, appropriate for your grade in school and use that topic for your exhibit title. If you are exhibiting leaves, they should be free of any damage and if you choose to write scientific names, they must be in either italics or underscored. (Note: scientific names are required for herbariums.) The Genus (first name) must have the first letter capitalized. The species (second name) has no capitalization.

Foresty 1-Grades 3–5

  1. Exhibit a poster based on one of the following activities:
    1. Leafing Out; Leaf Differences - (pg. 6 & 7) Collect, dry and mount 6 different species of leaves showing leaf differences: one leaf with opposite arrangement and one with an alternate arrangement, two leaves with different leaf margins, a compound leaf, and simple leaf. Use the 50 Trees of Indiana book (4-H 15-80) as a reference and identify the leaves and group them under the titles of "arrangement," "leaf margins," and "compound or simple." Draw (or copy the picture) and label the parts of a leaf using the diagram from the manual (Level 1). Title your poster, Leafing Out-Leaf Differences.
    2. Leafing Out; Collection - (pg. 6 & 7) Identify and exhibit leaves from 10 different trees that are listed in 50 Trees of Indiana book. List at least two unique characteristics of each tree. Title your poster, Leafing Out– Collection.
    3. Hold on Tight - (pg. 10 & 11), Dig up a small plant root system and display along with a drawing of the root system with the anchor, lateral, and feeder roots identified, and the “Parts of a Tree” diagram (4-H641B).
    4. Down in the Dirt - (pg. 20 & 21), Collect roots from 3 different habitats: woods, near a creek, and in a pasture or prairie. (Note: do not use the habitats listed in your manual.) Display the roots along with the completed root test chart (copy or recreate) showing the color, size, and shape information. Include any unique features you noted.
    5. My Couch is a Tree - (pg. 30 & 31), Use pictures (draw, cut from magazines, print, or take photographs) to show 10 things in and around your home that are made from wood.
    6. Fun in the Forest - (pg. 32 & 33), Visit a state park or forest, take your 50 Trees of Indiana book and diagram the trails you hiked, and list the types of trees you saw. Photographs of you hiking and some of the trees you saw will help tell your story.

Forestry 2 Grades 6–8

  1. Exhibit a poster based on one of the following activities:
    1. The Leaf Machine - (pg. 8 & 9), Copy, draw, or find a picture of a cross-section of a leaf. Label the 7 parts. (Give the chemical reaction for photosynthesis, defining the chemicals: CO2, H2O, O2, and C6H12O6. Be sure to balance your equation! There should be the same number of Carbon, Oxygen, and Hydrogen molecules on each side of the equal sign. You may need to ask an older (high school) 4-H member or science teacher for help. Draw the tree canopy, trunk, and roots, (or use the tree diagram, (4-H 641B) and identify the crown, trunk (with the parts; heartwood, sapwood, cambium and bark listed), feeder roots and anchor roots.
    2. My State’s Forests - (pg. 14 & 15), Use a map, draw or find a picture of Indiana on the Internet (e.g., www.in.gov/ingisi/). Show where your home, your school, your fairgrounds are located. Choose one of the following options to complete your poster. Show where Indiana’s State Forests are location. List a few facts about each. Visit State Forest and have someone take your picture by the sign, if possible. Show where some state parks and state forest are located (5-15). List some facts about each one. Visit state park or forest and have someone take your picture by the sign, if possible.
    3. Someone Call a (Tree) Doctor and Stop Bugging Me - (pg. 22-25), Collect 10 samples of tree leaves, twigs, stems, or roots damaged by insects or disease and the fruiting body or disease that caused the damage. List information about the insect or disease and the species of tree that was affected.
    4. Fire in the Forest - (pg. 26 & 27), Explain the Fire Triangle and describe what happened during and after a famous forest fire. Drawings or pictures will help tell the tale.
    5. Growing Every Day - (pg. 30 & 31), Complete the table for 5 large trees that you can find and measure in your county. Research to find out how to make and use a Tree Measuring Stick (FNT-4) and use that to calculate the volume of each tree. Explain why you think your results varied with the two methods of determining tree volume (the one in your 4-H manual or using a tree measuring stick).
    6. Tree Planting - Plant 1-3 shade trees. Include information about the tree (or trees) you planted, why you chose the species you did, what are the benefits of this tree, and how tall this tree (or trees) will be when mature. Explain why you chose the planting site that you did, where you found your planting information, what steps you followed, the hole size, care of your tree (watering and weed control) and any other information you can give. Include a picture of your tree (photo or drawing).

Forestry 3 Grades 9–12

  1. Exhibit a poster based on one of the following activities:
    1. A World of Forests - (pg. 16 & 17), Indicate the 3 major forest biomes on a copy, drawing or picture of the world. Complete the table given in the activity.
    2. City Trees - (pg. 20 & 21), Complete the questions about Tree City (pg. 20). Show (draw or use pictures) some trees that are often used in city plantings and explain the benefits of these trees.
    3. Trim the Trees - (pg. 26 & 27), Explain the 5 different kinds of tree pruning for urban trees. List some dos and don’ts of proper pruning.
    4. My Boss is a Tree - (pg. 34 & 35), List 5 jobs that require knowledge of trees and forestry. Explain the training and education that is needed and what types of things you might be doing if you had this job.
    5. Tree Planting - Present a tree planting plan for at least 100 trees. Include the type of trees you planted, pictures, cost, method of planting, weeding, pruning your trees and any additional information.
    6. Herbarium Collection; Trees - Collect 25 terminal twigs and at least two leaves, if space allows (only one compound leaf is required), from native forest trees. Mount the specimens on 11-1/2” x 16-1/2” paper. One leaf on the twig must be mounted to show the back side of the leaf. Label each sheet with the following: common name, scientific name, where collected, county where collected, date collected, name or collector and specimen number. Cover each specimen. There are no specific references given for these exhibits. Youth are encouraged to use Extension publications, Internet, books and forest specialists to develop these items.
    7. Herbarium Collection; Shrubs - Collect 25 terminal twigs, with leaves attached, from native shrubs. Mount the specimens on 11-1/2” x 16-1/2” paper. One leaf on the twig must be mounted to show the back side of the leaf. Label each sheet with the following; common name, scientific name, where collected, county where collected, date collected, name of collector and specimen number. Cover each specimen. There are no specific references given for these exhibits. Youth are encouraged to use Extension publications, the Internet, books and forest specialists to develop these items.
      Herbarium Collection Note: Your collection must be accessible to the judges. Do not cover it under the plastic that covers your poster. You may want to attach a folder or other holder over your poster to hold the mounted, covered specimens.

Independent Study: Grades 9-12
One State Fair entry

  1. Advanced topic - Learn all you can about an Indiana or Eastern Deciduous forestry topic of your choice and present it on a poster. Include a short manuscript, pictures, graphs, and list the works cited to describe what you did and what you learned. Title your poster, "Advanced Forestry-Independent Study."
  2. Mentoring - Exhibit a poster that shows how you mentored a younger 4-H member. Include your planning, the time you spent, the challenges and advantages of mentoring, and how the experience might be useful in your life. Photographs and other documentation are encouraged. Title your poster, "Forestry-Mentor."
  3. There are no specific references given for these exhibits. Youth are encouraged to use Extension publications, the Internet, books, and forest specialists to develop these items.

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