Crops
picture of a flooded field
Although two weeks of occasionally heavy rain and some unseasonably cold temperatures slowed planting progress and threatened newly emerging plants throughout Indiana, Purdue Extension corn specialist Bob Nielsen said there is still time to have a good grain crop if, as expected, weather conditions improved. The key, Nielsen said, is careful crop management.
picture of a flooded garden
Recent heavy rains across much of the state have resulted in widespread ponding and flooding in fields. This creates challenges for farmers growing produce for fresh consumption because of the potential for the introduction of contaminants into growing areas.
picture of dark rain clouds
With persistent, often heavy rainfall triggering flood alerts throughout Indiana during the last week of April and first week of May, many Hoosiers were concerned about possible damage to homes and newly planted grain crops. In response, Purdue University's Extension Disaster Education Network has compiled a list of online resources that could help Indiana homeowners and farmers coping with the storms' aftermath.
picture of grapes
After two months of unusually warm conditions throughout Indiana, state climatologists based at Purdue University believe temperatures will slowly return to seasonal norms over the next month, which is good news for fruit growers and home gardeners concerned that their plants might be emerging too quickly.
Farmers and farm workers seeking to comply with the 2017 Worker Protection Standard updates can get helpful information from the Office of Indiana State Chemist and Purdue Pesticide Programs.
2017 Corn & Soybean Field Guide cover
The 2017 edition of Purdue Extension's Corn and Soybean Field Guide is now available through Extension's The Education Store.
picture of a honeybee pollinating a plant
A new publication available from Purdue Extension could help crop producers minimize pesticide risk to pollinator species. Protecting Pollinators in Agronomic Crop Production, the latest publication in the Protecting Pollinators series, describes some of the risks pollinators may face when pesticides are applied to field crops, such as corn, soybeans or wheat.

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