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Sinkholes can have an adverse effect to our water quality. In this video, Purdue biologists interview a local cave expert and a local conservationist about how sinkholes are connected to our rivers, streams, and water supplies and how we can help protect them.
picture of a corn field with farm buildings in the distance
After sluggish harvests last year, Indiana farmers could produce record or near-record grain crops this year, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture report released Friday (Aug. 12). The report forecasts Indiana corn production at 1.05 billion bushels, up from 822 million bushels last year. That would be the second highest production on record.
Farmers should be on the lookout for roots and sediment clogging their tile drains this year, a Purdue University soil physics specialist advises. Reports of roots clogging tile drains increased dramatically in early 2016 and investigations are underway to determine why, said Eileen Kladivko, professor of agronomy at Purdue.
Anna Morrow
The Midwest Cover Crops Council has responded to increasing interest in cover crops across the region by hiring its first program manager, a Purdue Extension educator. Anna Morrow began her new role with the MCCC as a staff member in Purdue University's Department of Agronomy on July 1. She now works out of Extension's Shelby County office and will be on the university's West Lafayette campus as needed.
Indiana fruit and vegetable growers bringing irrigation systems into operation as production gets into full swing should have their water tested as part of good agricultural practices for produce food safety, Purdue Extension food safety educator Scott Monroe says.
photo of soybean field exhibiting blight
Soybean farmers with plants that have emergence issues should consider that seedling blight diseases might be the cause, a Purdue Extension field crops pathologist says.
photo of a dry soybean field being irrigated
Late-planted grain crops may be reaching a critical stage of development just as the weather is turning drier, possibly meaning farmers will have to irrigate earlier than normal, says Lyndon Kelley, irrigation specialist for the Purdue and Michigan State Extension services.

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