bale of hay
A Purdue University veterinarian urges livestock farmers to test their hay before relying on it as the sole ration for their cattle this year because a very wet spring delayed some harvests. Mature hay has less energy than hay cut at earlier maturity and is not likely to adequately support a cow's nutritional needs during winter, said W. Mark Hilton, clinical professor of food animal production medicine.
The relationship between the age of a deer and its antler development can be an indicator of the deer's health, and whether foraging conditions or harvest strategies should be changed. This quick and easy instructional video, "Age Determination in White-Tailed Deer", will walk you through the techniques.
Forest trees.
This free Forest Management Twilight Tour held October 22, 2015, includes opportunities for discussion on tree identification, timber stand improvement, invasive species identification and control, timber harvesting and marketing.
Dr. Dan Cassens cutting lumber.
Upcoming Hardwood Lumber Workshops offer resources and training on sawmill maintenance, trouble shooting, scanning, sawing, marketing, sales and more. Dan Cassens, Purdue FNR professor of wood products, and experts through the Indiana Hardwood Lumbermen's Association (IHLA) will be providing valuable information for producers and users of hardwood lumber.
image of a Deathwatch beetle
I walked into one of those big box stores the other day and the three or four aisles filled with Halloween decorations caught my eye. In one of the aisles was a large sign that read "Boo Bugs."
On Friday (Oct. 9) the Purdue University Board of Trustees approved naming the Hall of Animal Sciences and the Center for Experiential Learning - facilities scheduled to open in 2017 - for the Creighton Brothers founders and Land O' Lakes, respectively, in recognition of their gifts.
For this podcast we discuss the fall migration of our feathered reptiles, also known as birds. Just about anywhere you are this time of year, you might notice flocks of birds forming in the sky or new visitors on your bird feeders.