Environment
Invasive plant species, hemlock
If you've been curious why invasive plants are always in the news and wondering if you have any on your farm or woodland, then you will want to join us on July 28th at the Feldun Purdue Ag Center for a forest management workshop and free meal.
Garlic Mustard
If you are looking for practical information on the identification and control of invasive plant species in woodland environments, the Forest Invasives Field Day is for you. The Forest Invasives Field Day will take place on August 16th at the Pinney Purdue Agricultural Center in Wanatah, Indiana.
Don't be a zombie exhibit
This year's Indiana State Fair will offer plenty of thrills, but it is unlikely fairgoers will experience anything quite like the ghoulish fun of the newest exhibit in the Purdue Extension Agriculture/Horticulture Building. Called Don't Be a Zombie - Be Prepared, the exhibit consists of a walk-though maze and interactive video game designed to simulate a zombie apocalypse. The adventure ends at an underground storm shelter stocked with all the supplies necessary for survival in an emergency.
Lindsey Purcell Pruning
In the AgriNews article "Pruning ground rules," Urban Forestry Specialist Lindsey Purcell shares some helpful guidelines for pruning trees in the urban environment.
Indiana fruit and vegetable growers bringing irrigation systems into operation as production gets into full swing should have their water tested as part of good agricultural practices for produce food safety, Purdue Extension food safety educator Scott Monroe says.
Walnut
Indiana Chapter of the Walnut Council is hosting a national conference called Heartwood in the Heartland for woodland owners interested in growing walnut trees and other hardwoods on July 31-August 3 at the DoubleTree by Hilton hotel in Lawrenceburg, IN. Registration for Heartwood in the Heartland is due on July 21st.
Soil Picture
Question: We want to plant five fastigiata (upright blue spruce) in an area with heavily compacted soil with large percentage of clay content in the soil. The soil essentially feels and handles like play dough. Water cannot drain down in the soil because of the high clay content. Ewes were planted but they are dying since they are sitting in clay soil with water standing around the roots. Do you have an arborist you can suggest to come out and look at our situation?

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